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INSPIRATION AND ADVICE

3 TOP TIPS FOR FINDING AUTHENTIC VINTAGE

ASOS Marketplace is home to LOADS of vintage sellers – and these guys are the best of the best. But when you're buying vintage, it can be tricky to differentiate between the OGs and the wannabes 🔍 So, how do you spot *true* vintage pieces? What even is 'true vintage', you ask? Well, we're talking about garms that're genuinely from the decade you're looking for (e.g. a tee from the 90s, rather than a tee from 2010 that looks like it's from the 90s). Luckily, we have some vintage pros at ASOS Marketplace HQ 🤓 so we caught up with Caoimhe to get her top three tips for spotting authentic vintage pieces…

Vintage label

LABEL LESSONS

There's a lot to learn from vintage labels. If you’re after the real thing, look for unique label designs, often with bold colours, funky slogans and authentic stitch-work. Particularly for vintage clothing made in the US, pieces were made in factories that would belong to a specific union, so if your garment includes a union label accompanied with a lot number, this is a great seal of authenticity ✅ It’s also important to note that items made pre-1960s won’t have the same care symbols or sizes we see on labels today!
Vintage Waistcoat

THE DEVIL'S IN THE DEETS

Any intricate stitch-work, appliqué, embroidery or beading that looks handmade is a good sign you’re onto a genuine vintage winner 🥇 The machines used to manufacture modern pieces usually create a more precise look. Then, take a look at the stitching, we’re looking for a zig-zag format or a single-stitched edge, rather than the double-row stitching we’re used to today. Plus, when it comes to pre-1960s vintage, the hardware will always be metal – plastic zips didn't come into use until the 70s 🪡
Vintage blouse

Pictures: ASOS

FABRIC FEELS

Finally, it’s time to peep the fabric composition 👀 Doing a bit of research about the popular materials used during the period you’re trying to source from will make things wayyy easier. For example, suede and denim were HUGE in the 70s, but velour and velvet serve big 80s NRG. As well as what was trending, it's also good to keep in mind that, generally, older items are less likely to be made from a blend of fabrics.

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